Newspaper clips many relating to bells in Ditcheat

Western Gazette - Friday 17 January 1873

Taunton Courier, and Western Advertiser - Wednesday 22 January 1873

DITCHEAT.

Fashionable Marriage, —The marriage of Miss Leir, of Ditcheat, took place from her father’s house on Wednesday, the 8th inst, to Mr Robert Lecky-Watson, of Kilconner House, co. Carlow. Most of the relatives of the bride and bridegroom were present, and they were fortunate enough to have bright sun and no rain, for a wonder. The village had been prettily decorated, an avenue of fir trees having been planted each side of the road through which the carriages passed, and triumphal arches bearing the usual mottoes of success and happiness. The entrance to the church was boarded and decorated with evergreens to the road, in case the weather should prove unpropitious, and a large flag floated from the church tower. The ceremony was performed by the brother and cousin of the bride, who was attended the following bridesmaids :—Miss Anderson, .Miss Dean-Drake, Miss Brady, Miss May Leir; the bridegroom’s brother officiating as best man. The church was completely filled, and the coup d'œil in the fine old Gothic building was very imposing. A recherché breakfast was provided at the hospitable house of the worthy rector, and partaken of by between 40 and 50. At half-past two the carriage came round, drawn hy the tenants, who did not band it over to the postboys till was out of the village, and the happy couple started, amidst the cheers of the villagers and ringing of bells, route for the Continent. The presents e very numerous, not the least appreciated being those from the tenants, villagers, and servants, including very handsome silver centrepiece from Watson's tenants in Ireland.

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Salisbury and Winchester Journal - Saturday 27 January 1877

DITCHEAT, SOMERSET.

TO TIMBER DEALERS, CONTRACTORS OTHERS.

MR. WILLIAM PALMER will SELL AUCTION, at the BELL INN, DITCHEAT, Somerset, WEDNESDAY, the 31st day of JANUARY, inst., at Three for Four o'clock in the afternoon, subject to such conditions as will then produced—286 TIMBER TREES, consisting chiefly of exceedingly fine ELM, suitable for Navy and other purposes, and small number of useful OAK and ASH, marked numerically, and which will be offered lots. Special attention is directed to the Elm, many of the Trees are of size and quality rarely equalled, and the whole is well situated for removal, being near to good roads and only a short distance from the Evercreech Junction, Cole, Bruton, or Castle Cary Railway Stations. William Clothier, the Keeper, will be in attendance at the Bell Inn, Ditcheat, every morning Ten o'clock to show lots 1 to 21; Mr. Bord, of White Horse Farm, Wyke, will appoint person show lots 22 to 31; and Mr. Ovens, of will appoint a person to show lots 32 to 35. Catalogues may be had on application to the Auctioneer, Plox House, Bruton, Somerset.

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Western Gazette - Friday 30 August 1878

DITCHEAT.

Coming of Age Festivities.—On Thursday, merry peals from the church bells announced the coming of age of Mr. G. Welch, only son of Mr. C Welch, Longhill Farm. In the evening a dance came off in the barn, which had been carefully prepared and taste- fully decorated with evergreens, flags, and mottoes suitable for the occasion. The company, which numbered nearly 70, began to arrive shortly after 9 pm., and dancing immediately commenced, to the enlivening strains of Rumsey’s quadrille band. It was heartily enjoyed until late hour in the morning. The valuable collection of presents on view in the drawing room, as well as the deafening applause with which their health were drunk, showed the respect and esteem in which Mr welch and family are held by the residents of the neighbourhood.

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Western Gazette - Friday 24 September 1880

DITCHEAT.

Sunday Without Services.—A correspondent writes to complain that there was no service in Ditcheat Church last Sunday. Notice was given to some of the parishioners that there would be no service in the morning. In the evening, however, the bells were chimed and the congregation assembled as usual. Having waited in vain for half-an-hour for the appearance of clergyman, those present at last “gave it up" and returned home, sermonless. Our correspondent appears unable to offer any explanation of the occurrence, but we presume that some unavoidable circumstance or misunderstanding was at the bottom of it.

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Western Gazette - Friday 30 August 1889

DITCHEAT.

Marriage of Miss M. E. Bown.—On Wednesday afternoon, the Parish Church was filled large congregation to witness the marriage of Miss Marion Evangeline daughter of Mr. James Bown, to Mr. Sidney James Martin, of Whaddon Farm, Lamyatt. The day was beautifully fine. The ceremony was fixed for half-past one, and about that time the bridal party entered the church. The following were tbe bridesmaids:—Misses Polly Croom, Polly Bown, Becca Barber, Marie Perry, Flossie and Clara Butt. The bride and bridesmaids each carried a handsome bouquet of flowers. the bridal party entered the church, the organist (Mr. W. Norris) played the "Marche Aux Flambeaux " (by Scotson Clarke). The service, which was choral, commenced with the hymn, “The voice that breathed o'er Eden ;" and the middle of the service the hymn, " How welcome was the call," was sung. The ceremony was performed by the Rev. W. M. Leir (rector), assisted the Rev. P. N. Flinn (curate). The bride was given away by her father, Mr. James Bown, and the bridegroom's best man was Mr. John Whitehead. As the wedding party left the church, the organist played “Mendelssohn's Wedding March," and outside they were greeted with the customary shower of rice. At Alhampton, the residence of the bride, triumphal arches were erected, and number of flags displayed by the cottagers a mark of respect to the bride. About half-past four, the happy pair left, amid showers of rice and slippers and the congratulations of their friends, for North Devon. The bells of the Parish Church rang merry peals at intervals during the afternoon and evening, and the Union Jack was hoisted on the church tower. At night the arches were brilliantly illuminated with Chinese lanterns. The presents were numerous and costly.

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Western Gazette - Friday 27 December 1889

DITCHEAT.

Death of Mrt. Jas. Bown. The death announced Mr. Jas. Bown a well-known farmer, who has been resident at Alhampton for thirty-six years, and for the greater part of that period has been rector's churchwarden. The deceased gentleman, who, by his kindness and geniality, was very popular among all classes, will much missed. The funeral took place on Thursday, the 19th instant, and was attended by the Rector (the Rev. W. M. Leir) and his sons, and the principal farmers of the neighbourhood. The principal mourners were Mr. and Mrs. S. J. Martin (son-in-law and daughter the deceased), Mr. and Miss Croom, Messrs. Jas. Osborne (Prestleigh), Jno. Butt, Chas. Butt, Chas. Bown (Castle Cary), Chas. Croom. senr., Chas. jun. (Butleigh Wootton), Wm. Croom, Jno. Allen (Shepton Mallet), J. Martin (Lottisham), Thomas Bown (Westcombe), T. Crees (Lydford), W. J. N. Perry (ShepMallet), and Crees (Shrarpshaw). The coffin, which was polished oak with brass furniture, was covered with wreaths and crosses of white flowers. The Burial Service was impressively read by the Rev. Chas. Leir. After the ceremony, muffled peals was rung on the church bells. Sunday morning, at the Parish Church, special funeral hymns were sung, and the close of the service the organist (Mr. G. Norris) played the “Dead March " in Saul. appropriate sermon was preached by the Curate (the Rev. Weale).

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Western Gazette - Friday 31 January 1890

DITCHEAT.

Sale of Farm Stock at Ditcheat.—On Tuesday, Mr. C. M. Moody, of Pylle, sold auction at Farm, the whole of the live and dead farming stock, the property the late Mr. James Bown. There was large attendance, among the company being buyers from Nottingham, Shipton-on-Stour, etc. A capital cold luncheon was satisfactorily served by Mr. Wm. Lodge, of the Bell Hotel, Shepton Mallet. About 500 sat down. After luncheon the auctioneer proceeded with the sale the implements, which realised good prices. There were ninety-one head of stock on offer, the whole which were sold at satisfactory prices. The dairy cows realised prices ranging from £13 to £25 10s. A black cart horse, 6 years old realised 47gs., and a bay ditto, five years old, sold for 41gs. The bidding was very brisk, and the lots were quickly disposed of. After the sale of stock, the hay and the feed of the farm, and a quantity of roots were sold, realising good prices.

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Western Gazette - Friday 12 December 1890

DITCHEAT.

Quoit Club Supper.— The annual supper of the Ditcheat United Quoit Club was held on Friday evening at the Bell Inn, Arthur's Bridge. About thirty sat down. The catering of Mr. and Mrs. W. Roles was very satisfactory. The chair was taken by Mr. E. Martin (president of the club), and he was supported Messrs. J. Hill (captain), G. Norris (treasurer), H. J.- Roles (secretary), R. Harvey (Radstock), S. Hayes, W. J. Harvey, F. Adams, T. Wilcox, J. Rossiter, H. Roles, Bond, Creed, 11. Hallett, G. Hallett, etc. After the removal of the cloth, the toast of " The Queen and Royal Family " was enthusiastically drunk ; after which the Chairman was obliged leave, his health being drunk with musical honours.— The chair was taken for the remainder of the evening by Mr. S. Hayes, who proposed " Success to the Ditcheat United Quoit Club," coupled with the names of Messrs. J. Hill and H. J. Roles.—Mr. J. Hill, in responding, said that in the season just ended, the Club had played seven matches, and won five ; and he hoped that next season they would do better still.—Mr. H. J. Roles also responded. The number of members had increased since last year. Last year they had twenty-eight members with a balance in hand of 2s ; this year they had forty members, with a balance in hand of 12s 4d. A word of praise was due to their Captain, who contributed in a great degree to the success of the club.—Several complimentary toasts followed ; and songs were contributed during the evening by Messrs. G. Norris, H. J. Roles, H. Roles, J. Hill, F. Adiins, T. Wilcox, J. Rossiter, Bond, H. Hallett, G. Hallett, R. Harvey, and W. J. Harvey and at midnight the party broke up, after singing the National Anthem, having spent a most enjoyable evening.

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Shepton Mallet Journal - Friday 15 September 1893

DITCHEAT. 

The special service of thanksgiving for the harvest took place on Sunday last. The sacred edifice had been decorated for the occasion. The altar table was very nicely adorned, but the effect was somewhat marred by the decorations of the east window, the colour of the flowers used in the latter clashing with the bright scarlet of the cross on the table. Inside the altar rails were collections of palms, ferns &c. The windows of the chancel, excepting the east, had received no attention, but the chancel stalls were edged with white flowers and red The arches leading to the chancel were tastefully trimmed with box, corn and geraniums. The pulpit and reading desk were decorated with corn, barberries and geraniums. The windows of the nave had received much attention, and the taste displayed left nothing to be desired. The font looked very nice, being trimmed with white asters on moss ground. The service begun with holy communion at 8 a.m., at which the rector, the Rev. C. E. Leir, officiated. The sermon in the morning was preached the rector, and the Rev. R. Leir, of Charlton Musgrove, occupied the pulpit in the evening, when the church was crowded. The musical portion of the service was exceedingly well rendered, especially the anthem “Praise, praise,” Hall, and unaccompanied portions of the hymns. The solos were taken Messrs. T. Vincent and J. Gifford, and the quartette was most effectively rendered by Mr. Johnstone, Miss Barber and Messrs. Gifford and Vincent. The Te Deum was to setting of Hopkins, and the Magnificat and Nunc Dimitris were sung to Lloyd in F. The bells were rung at intervals during the day, and the collections on behalf of Shepton Mallet and Bath Royal Mineral water Hospitals amounted to £6 0s 0d.

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Shepton Mallet Journal - Friday 04 May 1894

DITCHEAT. 

Consecration of Burial Ground. —On Wednesday afternoon the additional Burial Ground, recently added to the Churchyard, was consecrated by the Right Rev. Bishop Bromby (acting for the Bishop of Bath and Wells), in the presence of a large congregation. The service which was fully choral, commenced with a shortened form of evensong in the church. The Bishop was accompanied the Rev. W. E. Daniel, R.D. (East Pennard), Rev. R. L, M. Leir, rector of Charlton Musgrove, and the Rev. Burley, curate of the parish. The processional hymn was, Onward Christian Soldiers.” The special Psalms were the 39th and 90th ; and the special lessons. Genesis xxiii, and 1 Thessalonians iv, from verse 13. Hymn number 221, A. & M., Let saints on earth in concert sing,” was sung after the third collect. The service in church concluded, the Bishop, with the clergy, choir, and congregation proceeded to the churchyard and perambulated the ground to be consecrated, singing the 49th and 115th Psalms. The sentence of consecration was read, and the necessary documents signed by the Bishop, who then gave earnest and impressive address, taking as the subject of his discourse Springtime The hymn, “Brief life is here our portion,” having been sung, the service closed with the Benediction. The bells rang at intervals during the afternoon, and the Union Jack floated from the church tower.